Men's Movement Song: Out of the Question

very social movement needs songs. Here's a men's movement song about the important topic of men having the confidence to decide for themselves how they want to live their lives, with all the life options they want to make part of their mix.

From Mark Sherman, the songwriter and performer:

“I wrote ‘Out of the Question’ in 1974 or ’75, when I was in my early 30s. It’s clearly a song from a young man who is still feeling the freedom that the Sixties were all about, but is now facing the constraints of work, marriage, and fatherhood. It’s addressing issues of creativity and the wild side of male behavior. The song opens with the lines, ‘Oh you say the only way for me to save myself/Is if I learn just how to behave myself.’ And it goes on to talk about the conflict between this kind of careful behavior and the still youthful need to be free. ‘Baby, maybe your way it won’t harm me,’ sings the songwriter, ‘But sometimes the alarm clock does alarm me.’

“I have an early version of the song on a homemade cassette tape from 1975, shortly after I wrote it, but this one was recorded in 2017 at a studio, under the direction of Jason Sarubbi, who also plays bass and percussion on the recording. Other musicians contributing to the recording are Jeremy Lawton on piano, and my son Matt Sherman on guitar and harmony vocals.”

Editor’s Note:

Mark Sherman received his PhD in Psychology at Harvard, and went on to a 25-year plus career as a college professor in the field. His main interest is in gender issues from a thoughtful and caring male perspective, and he has published extensively, including numerous blog posts on psychologytoday.com – including many on the subject of boys and men. In addition to his songwriting, he is also a humorist, who has written more than 700 humor columns for his local paper.

Build your own playlist based on your own interests.

©2020 Our-Comeback/Jack Kammer; some content ©2020 respective contributors with limited license to Our-Comeback/Jack Kammer; content owned by others is used in accordance with the Doctrine of Fair Use